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Katrina

March 6, 2008

When North Carolina Governor Michael Easley expressed his concern about formaldehyde in FEMA trailers, he joined a long list of critics. Easley was only the latest and perhaps an unusual voice.

February 15, 2008

Now that the Centers for Disease Control has affirmed long-held concerns about fumes in FEMA travel trailers, change could be coming in the Gulf Coast.

December 14, 2007

One of the best pieces of advice to come out of the latest CFED I'm Home Conference was news that the Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) will supply its homes to nonprofits virtually without cost.

August 14, 2007

An article in the latest Annals of Emergency Medicine reports that incidence of suicide attempts among residents in post-Katrina parks are 79 times higher than rates among the general public. The study surveyed residents in 92 different FEMA communities.

NPR has published an interesting radio piece to follow up on

July 27, 2007

A FEMA community in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi that was scheduled to close at the end of August will remain open at least through January of 2008.

FEMA granted the extension to Bay Village Trailer Park because the supply of

July 23, 2007

The BBC has posted an excellent set of documentary photographs. They attempt to get across the frustrations of residents living in a FEMA community in Baker, Louisiana.

July 21, 2007

Estimates say that Katrina has removed approximately 77,000 rental units from the stock of apartments in New Orleans. Many of those households that once rented are now in manufactured housing.

A story from the International Herald Tribune puts context to the numbers. The

July 21, 2007

Following on a Washington Post report on Friday that FEMA officials attempted to cover up problems associated with formaldehyde in FEMA trailers, the Associated Press writes today that FEMA will begin testing for air quality.

July 20, 2007

The Washington Post is reporting today that FEMA has suppressed reports of toxic levels of formaldehyde in FEMA trailers set up after Katrina. The reports come out of work done by the Sierra Club since 2006. Data suggests that levels reached 75 times beyond what the law considers the maximum safe level to be for workers.

July 19, 2007

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced that they will put a halt to mass evictions of residents in the temporary trailer camps established after